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"Adding a new member to a team can result in conflict. Changing the group dynamic so dramatically, and without the team's input, conflicts with Agile development's tenets of personal choice and team autonomy." ...
Google brings Google Now to a whole new levelAndroid fans have long sung the praises of Google Now, which stands as one of the platform's most useful features. On Friday Google announced that it would take its popular mobile assistant to the next level by letting more than thirty different third-party apps generate Google Now cards. RELATED:
UltimatePointer has patents for hand-held pointing devices, with which it said it planned to market laser pointers for business use. Apparently the court didn't see the connection to the Wii. ...
"Because I don't need to make the vertex counts match for each change in expression I can really push the facial animation. It also has the benefit of looking more 'hand made.'" ...
Insomniac breaks down AI design for open-world games, Riot shows you how to scale like League of Legends and Ubisoft details Unity's trick of AI recycling at GDC 2015. ...
The Blackberry sign is pictured in WaterlooBlackBerry Ltd named David Kleidermacher as its chief security officer on Tuesday, moving to further bolster the smartphone maker's credentials with security-conscious clients, including big players in the defense, automotive and healthcare sectors. Kleidermacher was previously chief technology officer at embedded software maker Green Hills Software, where he spent more than two decades. At Blackberry, he replaces Scott Totzke, who left the Waterloo, Ontario-based company last summer and is now the senior vice president of device and enterprise security at Chinese telecom equipment company Huawei Technologies Co. BlackBerry said Kleidermacher will oversee a number of key initiatives, including security-specific research and product development, and the company's product certification and approval program.
Handout picture of a group of huts in an isolated village inhabited by Yanomami Amerindians in southern VenezuelaBy Will Dunham WASHINGTON (Reuters) - Everyone's body is brimming with bacteria, and these microbes do plenty of good things like building the immune system and helping digestion. A study published on Friday looking at the gut, mouth and skin microbes in people from a small, isolated tribe in southern Venezuela's Amazonian jungles shows just how much modern life may be altering humankind's bodily bacteria. The Yanomami villagers, secluded from the outside world until 2009, possessed the most diverse collection of bacteria ever found in people including some never before detected in humans, said scientists whose research appears in the journal Science Advances. The researchers were surprised to learn the Yanomami's microbes harbored antibiotic-resistant genes including those conferring resistance to manmade antibiotics, considering they never had exposure to commercial antibiotics.
"If it's mentioned, no matter how old it is, do I feel compelled to sit down, reinstall it, and play it right then? If the answer is yes, then I'll consider it a favorite." ...
This year saw a notable shift in the video game industry that many traditional game critics would rather turn a blind eye to than investigate. ...
"Can we find a balance? Is there a way to give the player a long series of fights that have a continuity of resources between them, and yet each fight is interesting in and of itself?" ...
The Southeast Asian online game market is still growing, but a new report from market research firm Niko Partners suggests that regional interest may be shifting from PC to mobile games. ...
Imangi Studios cofounder Keith Shepherd speaks to Gamasutra about what the studio learned in making a VR-friendly version of its Temple Run games for Samsung's Gear VR headset. ...
Remember Direct2Drive? It's back. But now that Steam dominates the digital distribution landscape, how can D2D plan to compete? Gamasutra chatted with general manager Ed Lin to find out more. ...
Jeb Bush on Tuesday released a pile of e-mails from his time as Florida governor and an e-book that uses selected messages to narrate his first days in office. He says it's in “the spirit of transparency.” The almost-certain 2016 presidential candidate uses the e-mails to try to paint a picture of an absorbed state chief executive who reads and answers missives from constituents. At the beginning of the e-book, Mr. Bush talks of himself as the “e-governor” and brags that he spent upwards of 30 hours a week answering e-mails from his laptop and BlackBerry.
A quick guide to what it takes to make it in the Chinese mobile market -- from partnerships to localization tips and an explanation of what kinds of games Chinese users most enjoy. ...
U.S. regulators on Friday approved what would be the first commercialized biotech apple, rejecting efforts by the organic industry and other GMO critics to block the new fruit. The U.S. Department of Agriculture's Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS) approved two genetically engineered apple varieties designed to resist browning that have been developed by the Canadian company Okanagan Specialty Fruits Inc. Okanagan plans to market the apples as Arctic Granny and Arctic Golden, and says the apples are identical to their conventional counterparts except the flesh of the fruit will retain a fresh appearance even after it is sliced or bruised. Okanagan President Neal Carter called the USDA approval "a monumental occasion." "It is the biggest milestone yet for us, and we can't wait until they're available for consumers," he said in a statement. The Organic Consumers Association (OCA), which petitioned the USDA to deny approval, says the genetic changes that prevent browning could be harmful to human health, and pesticide levels on the apples could be excessive.
Look past the conflict in 2014, and you'll see an incredible amount of great games for all kinds of tastes. ...
The Commerce Department's third estimate of GDP growth on Friday was left unrevised at an annual rate of 2.2 percent following the third quarter's blistering 5.0 percent paceThe biotech sector is at the top of Wall Street's worry list as analysts debate whether high-flying pharma stocks are a bubble that is about to burst. Trade in biotech stocks was mixed Thursday as US stocks clawed back near even after early losses. Biotech stocks have been among the market's hottest investment over the last year, rising 35 percent on average, with some companies surging even more. Celgene has soared nearly 70 percent, giving it a market capitalization of $94.4 billion, more than Goldman Sachs.
Austin-based Cloud Imperium Games, one of the studios working on the crowdfunded space sim Star Citizen, is hiring a gameplay programmer to implement features and systems in CryEngine. ...
China has a long history of ostracising patients suffering from certain illnessesA student in Beijing is suing his university after he was allegedly expelled for having the rare hereditary blood disease haemophilia, reports said on Friday, the latest case in China's long history of medical discrimination. The student, identified by the pseudonym Zheng Qing, is suing the China Institute of Industrial Relations after he was officially expelled earlier this month, the government-run Global Times reported. The student's lawyer, Wang Qiushi, was quoted as saying that regulation referred to students who "cannot finish their studies or cannot take care of themselves". China has a long history of ostracising patients suffering from certain illnesses.
(Reuters) - Eugene Patton, the stage hand who earned fame as "Gene Gene The Dancing Machine" on the quirky talent romp "The Gong Show," has died at the age of 82 after suffering from diabetes, his family said. At what were supposed to be spontaneous moments in the show launched in the 1970s that celebrated offbeat and sometimes awful acts, Count Basie's upbeat "Jumpin' at the Woodside" would blast out and host Chuck Barris would bellow out "Gene Gene the Dancing Machine," setting the stage for Patton.
"My criterion is simple; when you've reached end of your big buzz, stimulate the late buyers with the incentive of a lower price." ...
Gamasutra speaks to Oculus CTO John Carmack to learn more about how Oculus' new Mobile SDK works and what it means for developers who are currently making -- or thinking about making -- VR games. ...
A Spanish hospital has successfully used stem cells, like those pictured here, culled from healthy donors to treat heart attack victimsA Spanish hospital has successfully used stem cells culled from healthy donors to treat seven heart attack victims, in what officials said was a world first. Madrid's Gregorio Maranon hospital plans to treat 55 patients in all with the technique in a clinical trial, the regional Madrid government which runs the hospital said in a statement. "Seven patients have already been operated on and they have progressed very well despite having suffered serious damage to their heart tissue," it added. It is the first time that allogeneic cells -- stem cells that come from another person -- have been used to repair damage to a heart caused by a heart attack, the statement added.
This CD cover image released by Sub Pop Records shows Father John Misty, "I Love You, Honeybear" (Sub Pop)

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